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Residency Emergency Medicine, Trauma Surgery


As reflected in my curriculum vitae, I was a non-traditional student when accepted into XXXX University Medical School. I'd had many unique opportunities in the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medicine, which gave me a solid clinical base as well as experiences in training, program administration and entrepreneurial business ventures. While my career is obviously very important to me, my wife and son remind me daily of the importance of balance between my career and personal life. These life experiences heavily influenced my decision to pursue Medical School, and they became one of my greatest assets during the clinical years of my training. Now, as I anticipate the opportunities and challenges of my medical career, I do so with even greater enthusiasm and a renewed commitment to excellence in my professional and personal life.

I approached medical education with my mind open toward all career options. Although I enjoyed most of my third year clerkships, especially in Internal Medicine and Psychiatry, it was on the Trauma Surgery team that I rediscovered my passion for Emergency Medicine. I enjoy both the pace and the diversity of Emergency Medicine; no other field seems to offer such a wide variety of experiences. I recently completed a four week senior rotation in the Emergency Department, during which I decided to pursue Emergency Medicine as my career.

I believe Emergency Physicians need a solid knowledge base in many different medical specialties, accompanied by excellent physical assessment and diagnostic skills. These characteristics fit my personality well; I require stimulation and diversity in my work and personal life, yet I can be meticulous and detail-oriented when necessary. My pre-hospital experiences help me appreciate the role of every member of a patient care team, but I am also accustomed to making decision and acting as a team leader. In addition, my non-traditional background contributes to quickly establishing rapport with patients, leading to a cooperative therapeutic relationship. Many of these skills and personality traits can not be taught in medical school; excellent physicians seem to develop them after practicing for many years and gaining confidence in their abilities.

I have a great deal to learn about practicing medicine, despite my inherent strengths and my life experiences. In residency training I want to learn from leaders in the field of Emergency Medicine and develop mentoring relationships with people whose experience can help guide my own pursuit of excellence. I hope, in turn, to someday continue that tradition and be involved in training other future physicians. I believe a career in Emergency medicine affords me the opportunity for a challenging and stimulating career which incorporates my inherent skills and life experiences yet allows for balance between my personal and professional life.

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