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Residency IM, Gastroenterology, NIgerian Doctor

Growing up in the southern part of Nigeria, I was always a diligent student with diverse interests. In particular, I excelled in the sciences and dreamed of becoming a doctor, someone who could cure my sick mother. I developed great admiration and respect for physicians visiting my mother when she was critically ill. Later, when she died, while I was in medical school, we worked together to do everything that we could to save her. Medicine is a noble endeavor but it cannot save us all. My mother’s fragile health and subsequent passing has left me filled with sweet memories of her love that accompany me in the practice of medicine. Everything that I have learned in life, in one way or another, has prepared me to practice Internal Medicine. I see this area as the queen, the foundation of all medical practice and it is to this area that I am devoting my life.

 Despite being largely responsible for raising my little brothers and sisters and taking care of my mother, I graduated from the University of Nigeria, one of the highest ranked schools in the country.  After my internship, I performed community service for one year as a volunteer field ambulance medical officer.  My subsequent employment with the Military Hospital provided me with additional experience and exposure in internal medicine, pediatrics, ob-gyn, emergency and psychiatry. Working through an HIV pandemic in Nigeria further enhanced and tested all of my abilities. Many cases seemed so completely hopeless, but since I believe that all life is sacred, I embraced this challenge with passion. Using what I had learned in England, I continued to care for these patients long after my colleagues had given up.  My commitment was rewarded with success in many instances. I recall one case, for example, of a dying woman, diagnosed with HIV after giving birth. As the senior medical officer and backbone of my unit, I led our team into action. With great determination, sensitivity, and purpose, we battled and were able to save her life.

In 1997, I took a study leave to do a residency in Internal Medicine at Lagos University Hospital.  The following year my country experienced grave political instability and many institutions were forced to shut down.  In 2001, after completing the Professional and Linguistic Assessment Board (PLAB) Exam, I performed rotations in general medicine for one year in England. Next, I returned to the Military Hospital and stayed until 2007, at which time I had the opportunity to come to the United States. I have been preparing myself for a residency program where I will be able to receive additional training in an advanced technological environment, also helping me to be a more productive and to be able to do creative research in the future. While studying for the USMLE exams, I fulfilled a clinical observership in Internal Medicine and will commence a clinical externship in November so that I will have additional hands-on experience with comprehensive medical care in the United States.

My personal qualities of dedication, intellectual curiosity, compassion and my ability to control my emotions are all qualities which are of critical importance to the practice of internal medicine.  I look forward to entering a residency program which will have a special emphasis in preventive medicine, and the management of acute, complex, and chronic conditions. Upon completion of your program, I hope to obtain a fellowship in gastroenterology.

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